The OSS Team

The Outdoor Swimming Society (OSS) is a worldwide collective of swimmers who share the joy, adventure and experience of swimming under an open sky. At its helm is an ever changing  cast of people who give their time and talents. We can always do more with more people; whether you can take a year round role or help out as a volunteer. Autumn is our prime turnover time, with our team AGM and people either recommitting for another year or stepping back. Please see the ‘jobs’ page or contact hello@outdoorswimmingsociety.com if you’d like to join us and describe roles you have the skills and desire to take.

Kate Rew

Founder

Ross Edgley

Ambassador

Robert Macfarlane

Patron

love-your-rivers-outdoor-swimming-society-patron-alistair-humphreys

Alastair Humphreys

Patron

Beth Pearson

Content editor

outdoor-swimming-society-team-calum-maclean

Calum Maclean

OSS Ambassador

Kari Furre

Muse

Oli Pitt

Social Media

Swimstaman

OSS Special Envoy

Mark Harper

Expert Advisor : Cold Water

Peter Hancock

Contributor

Anna White-Sharman

OSS Shop

Nathan Willmott

Legal Advisor

Robert Aspey

OSS Inland Access Officer

Chris Dalton

Joint Leader & OSS Thames Group - OSS Inland Access Group

Fiona Pettengale

Wild Swim Map Editor

Imogen Radford

Inland Access Officer

Tim Bridges

King of Logistics

Susanne Masters

Content writer

laura sanderson

Laura Sanderson

Instagram curator

Sara Barnes

Content proofreader and writer

Lexi Earl

Book reviewer

Rosy Eaton

Campaigner

Chris Booth

Wildswim map editor

owen hayman

Owen Hayman

Campaigner

Erin Jeffery

Executive Assistant

Ali Couch

Wild Swim Groups Coordinator

Jon Stubbington

Dart 10k Event Manager

Karen Smith

OSS Swim Champ Coordinator

Justine Harvey

OSS News Editor

Kate Rew

Kate Rew founded The Outdoor Swimming Society (OSS) in 2006 and has been delighted to see it grow into the movement that it is today. At the start of 2019 the OSS had over 70,000 members across it’s channels: the free fornightly newsletter, OSS instagram, and a thriving Facebook community. It has taken tens of thousands of swimmers on beautiful long distance swims since it’s inception.

Kate grew up swimming in a river in Devon, swam all over the country for her book Wild Swim, and now lives with her husband and children in Somerset. In 2016 she received an award from the International Swimming Hall of Fame (ISHOF) for her contributions to recreational swimming.

To talk to Kate’s agent please call Patrick Walsh at PEW Literary.

Follow Kate on Instagram @kate_rew. Follow the OSS @theoutdoorswimmingsociety

Ross Edgley

He swam around the British Isles – and now he’s joined the OSS Team as an ambassador! Ross Edgley embodies the best of the outdoor swimming community: a maverick, with humour, honesty, integrity, grit, and a love of adventure and joy.

We are delighted to have him on board helping us change more hearts and minds with him.

Follow Ross on @rossedgley

Robert Macfarlane

Rob is the author of Mountains of the Mind and The Wild Places, and a Fellow of Emmanuel College, Cambridge, where outdoor swimming has allegedly been going on since 1692. He is a mountain climber whose ideal mountain day ends with a plunge in a river, loch or the sea.

He’s been winter swimming in Beijing’s imperial lakes, in the Himalayas, and once went green after diving into a Devon lake on New Year’s Day. He was a good friend and swimming companion of the late Roger Deakin, author of the swimming classic ‘Waterlog’.

Follow Rob on @robgmacfarlane

Alastair Humphreys

Alastair Humphreys is a British Adventurer, Author and Blogger who joined the OSS as a patron in 2018.  Alastair spent over four years cycling round the world, a journey of 46,000 miles through 60 countries and five continents.

More recently Alastair has walked across southern India, rowed across the Atlantic Ocean, run six marathons through the Sahara desert, completed a crossing of Iceland, busked through Spain and participated in an expedition in the Arctic, close to the magnetic North Pole. He has trekked 1000 miles across the Empty Quarter desert and 120 miles round the M25 – one of his pioneering microadventures. And he swims on them all –  “including in the Empty Quarter when we swam in a puddle after a sudden storm!”

Alastair was named as one of National Geographic’s Adventurers of the Year in 2012. He loves wild swimming and believes it has an important contribution to make to people’s fun, mental and physical health, love and protection of the landscape, and sense of adventure. He sees the role of the OSS is to raise the profile of swimming outdoors in order to help care for wild places and permit legal access to these places. His ambition as a patron of the OSS is to encourage more people to leap into a river for the very first time.

Beth Pearson

Beth’s first love is sea swimming, based on her childhood along the North East coast of Scotland and an adulthood of spontaneously stripping and dipping whenever the opportunity presented itself. After swimming through her PhD – mainly in chlorine – she decided to be less spontaneous about it. So far that has meant learning not to swim barefoot in sub-zero lochs and finding out which inland swimming spots are reachable by public transport. In short, she now always packs her dookers.
Beth joined the OSS team in 2018 to develop, commission and edit content for its website, drawing on 16 years of her former career in features journalism (one of the highlights of which was swimming around Gourock outdoor pool with dictaphone aloft, interviewing its stalwarts). She is particularly interested in hearing and telling stories about the swimming community in the UK and beyond. If you have a story, email her at editor@outdoorswimmingsociety.com

Calum Maclean

Calum is an obsessive outdoor swimmer, swimming year round in skins – sometimes dipping, sometimes longer distance. ‘The lure of new water is what drives me. I can never settle at having a “regular” swim spot, and living in the Highlands of Scotland, I am spoilt for choice. Hunting out lochs in the hills, or river pools, hidden from roads and crowds: this makes me feel alive; swimming allows me to relax, think and fires my creativity.”
Calum has been a huge contributor to the outdoor swimming community in recent years, with his photography, filming and swimming all combining in some viral films. We were delighted to have him join the team in 2017 as an ambassador. “In 2018 I’ll be sharing more films, photos, swim discoveries and stories with the OSS, and plotting more swims on the map. The more people who are encouraged to dip a toe, or dive into the world of outdoor swimming, the better!” He is also swimming the Hurly Burly.
‘People often ask me why I swim in so many places, and how it started. I’m never quite sure but I can trace a jump in my swimming frequency to a solo crossing of the River Derwent in Hobart, Tasmania in 2009. After talking to my father, who it turns out was a young bushwalker, I realise he used to regularly “bag” lakes and rivers in Tasmania with friends – so perhaps the obsession is in the genes!’

To follow Calum’s photography (and enjoy his humour):

  • Instagram: @caldamac
  • Blog goneoffswimming.com
  • See also viral videos on BBC The Social on wild swimming, and TV series for the Gaelic channel BBC ALBA – Dhan Uisge (Into the Water).

Find the OSS on insta: @theoutdoorswimmingsociety

Kari Furre

Kari, a Devon sculptor and swimmer, is the OSS muse. Where Kari dreams, the rest of us follow – she has worked with Kate on many things that have become mainstays of the OSS movement, such as Breastrokes (our inland charity swims held in  2006 and 2007), the Dart10k, the Swoosh and the Hurly Burly.

Kari is an active swimmer in Devon, where she lives, and is constantly investigating and introducing people to new stretches of the coast and the Dart. She teaches swimming in Devon and London, specialising in a very gentle kind of instruction and effortless swimming that gets you thinking of your relation to the water, helps overcome deep water fears, and has everyone under her tuition doing butterfly in a light, grunt-free way.

To see her sculpture and work with fish skin: www.karifurre.co.uk.

Oli Pitt

Oliver was an early convert to the way of the Outdoor Swimming Society and has been up-hill and down-dale on swims – as well as stoking the hot tub, mulling the wine and making the chai – ever since.

Never short of a good idea, and not work-shy, Oli moderates the OSS Facebook group and page and is a regular face at OSS Events. He swam the Dart10k 10 mile course in 2015 and did a channel relay in 2016. Oli looks after the OSS Facebook group, keeping it friendly and ad-free.

Swimstaman

Dubbed “the Stig of swimming” by the Wild Swimming Brothers, we don’t know ourselves quite who Swimstaman is. Some say he was raised by otters. Others that he has an irrational fear of swans. All we can say for sure is that Swimstaman brings creativity, adventure and fresh water tales from his Alpine hideout in Switzerland.

We are happy to welcome @swimstaman to the team as Special Envoy in 2018, during which he plans to write for us on (among other things) swimming with the Special Forces and crossing the Dardanelles.

In the shadowy past we hear he has been a visionary design award winner, a former BBC Worldwide journalist, a Senior Lecturer (at only 26) and the ‘Best swimmer in the school’. He swam for Lancashire (once!), which is once more than the rest of us. He now lives in Switzerland doing stig-like things we can’t know about, with nine working fingers. We have no expectation of unmasking his true identity.

Follow him on instagram: @swimstaman, @theoutdoorswimmingsociety

Mark Harper

Have a question about cold water or the effect of swimming on your body? Pose it to the OSS Expert Adviser, Dr Mark Harper.

Dr Mark Harper is a consultant anaesthetist at Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals who, accidentally and via quite unrelated routes, has developed an interest in the negative effects of getting cold during surgical operations and the positive effects of cold water swimming. He therefore spends much of his professional life researching ways to keep patients warm and his personal life enjoying swimming in a cold sea.

Mark answers swimmers’ queries on cold water via email. Send your questions to Mark here.

Peter Hancock

Peter has been swimming since he was four years old, sometimes competitively, but mostly just for fun. He grew up in the rivers, lakes and waterfalls of inland New South Wales and Far North Queensland. At six years old, he found a freshwater mussel in the soft mud of the Bogan River. It was huge – almost the size of his forearm, and seemed content to live in water so filled with suspended silt that it blocked out all light. Since then, he’s spent his spare time swimming after fish, searching under logs, and swimming his way through a PhD and into a job as an aquatic ecologist.

Having swum in thousands of places in Australia, New Zealand, Japan, and other locations around the world, Peter believes that it is the infinite variety and beauty of outdoor swimming that keeps him searching for the next place to dive in. He’s swum every day for the past three years, mostly in Dumaresq Dam, a beautiful small lake near Armidale in New South Wales. In 2015 he swam in 333 different places because so many rivers, lakes and oceans got in his way.

Peter loves swimming in all kinds of water, in all types of weather and in any frame of mind. He’s interested in the cultural aspects too – poetry, literature and the visual arts, history and science. He complements his swimming with other water-related activities that include scuba diving, free diving, body surfing and rock skipping. This makes him the life of any party. Well, it would if he showed up instead of slinking off somewhere for a swim.

Anna White-Sharman

I’ve been part of the OSS since November 2012. I manage the day-to-day running of the online shop, answer merchandise enquiries and I am responsible for getting all the orders sent out to you.
I love spending time at the coast and enjoy swimming in the sea.
You can contact Anna about shop merchandise via shop@outdoorswimmingsociety.com

Nathan Willmott

Nathan is a lawyer and his firm Berwin Leighton Paisner and has been providing legal advice to the Outdoor Swimming Society on a pro bono basis since 2008.  Their advice to the OSS covers many issues, including access rights for swimmers, intellectual property and legal liability issues.

Swimming outdoors  is potentially a risky business and so we are profoundly thankful to BLP for providing the OSS with a framework that allows us to continue to do so with passion and common sense.

It was as a result of Nathan’s loyal support that we were able to operate free ‘social swims’ under the terms of the Swim Responsibility Statement in the early days of Facebook – an operation in personal responsibility and freedom which led to the establishment of Facebook wild swimming groups across the land. Nathan also enables us to make a deposition to the Welsh Assembly on Inland Access, and countless other smaller victories along the way.

Whenever he can escape his desk, Nathan heads for the water. His favourite swimming holes are London Fields Lido and St Ives bay in Cornwall. He is always on the lookout for new and fun swimming challenges and has particularly enjoyed swimming the Solent and Hellespont.

Robert Aspey

Robert became interested in trying to increase outdoor swimming facilities in England and Wales after experiencing the plentiful swimming lakes and reservoirs in countries such as Germany, France and Switzerland.

He and Chris Dalton set up the OSS Inland Access Group in 2012 in order to help members work together, discuss and share advice to increase access to inland water for swimming. It is managed via a Facebook Group, which welcomes new members and includes helpful guides and information to help with increasing access.

The group has had several high profile successes opening up new bathing areas such as Rutland Water Bathing Beach and Swan Pool near Birmingham, and is making good progress on similar projects with members across England and Wales.

Robert can be contacted via the Facebook Group or by email.

Chris Dalton

Chris broke free from the confines of the swimming pool on a beautiful June evening in 2010 when he went on an OSS Full Moon swim in the Nene. Since then he has been more often spotted splashing his way down the Thames than up and down a pool. He is currently working with the Canal and River Trust in an attempt to secure greater access to their waterways.

Contact Chris here

Fiona Pettengale

Fiona joined the OSS in 2016 to support the sister site, wildswim.com, as map editor, helping the swim community by curating collections on the map, and sharing them with the OSS site. Her first major task was the festive swim list – a list of over 100 Christmas and Boxing Day swims.

A keen swimmer at Vobster Quay in Somerset where she lives, Fiona likes the 10k distance and travels the country doing longer swims as part of events, and under her own steam.

You can contact Fiona about the map via email.

Imogen Radford

Imogen likes swimming in rivers. She first did it as a child, but then rediscovered her passion for it in 2012, after reading Roger Deakin’s Waterlog. She set about revisiting places where Roger Deakin had swum, visiting places others swim and finding her own swimming spots for dips or slightly longer swims (these days all through the year).

In discovering outdoor swimming Imogen very soon realised that it is surrounded with issues about access to inland waters and – connected issues – how important it is for better understanding of swimmers by others, especially the authorities, and for swimmers to understand how to swim safely. Without more places to swim, people have fewer opportunities to learn how to do so safely.

So Imogen has now become involved in campaigns and discussions about access through her work as part of the Inland Access Group.

Tim Bridges

Who tethers the event shelters when the storms come in? Who makes illuminated event signs at the Swoosh and 10ft-high Dart10k signs to welcome the event swimmers in? Who digs the press RIB out of the mud and cockles with his bare hands when someone stayed in the pub a bit too long? Tim does.

The man behind every fixed urn and mended flag pole at events has been working hard behind the scenes since the first Dart10k, and also spends a lot of time travelling the country with Kate and their two young boys in search of great swims. Not a natural distance swimmer (has a body made to sink) he is however up for any adventure, has always got into water wherever he finds it, and always (always) has all the kit.

Susanne Masters

Susanne has swum from Asia to Europe in the Bosphorus, in winter swimming events in China, and usually fits in a swim everywhere she travels for work (selecting ingredients for spas and distilleries, writing about wildlife and places).  Her favourite swims are those on the doorstep, whether that is a bivvy under the stars or waterside lodge, and often end with freshly foraged ingredients.
Since 2012 Susanne has written about an assortment of topics for the OSS from equipment to wildlife and places to swim.  Susanne is keen to expand coverage of accessible swimming spots  and welcomes anyone to get in touch with her if they have places to add to this collection or questions about accessibility.

Susanne can be found on Instagram

Laura Sanderson

Laura runs the Outdoor Swimming Society Instagram. If you would like to chance to be featured then please use the hashtags #outdoorswimmingsociety and #sharetheswimlove .

Laura lives in Snowdonia and first volunteered with the OSS at the Hurly Burly putting up shelters, selling merchandise and sorting out everyone’s post swim kit. This year she hopes to swim the Hurly Burly.

When Laura is not running the Instagram, she can be found swimming in the many otherworldly lakes, quarries and sea coves of Snowdonia. She is an Artist and Art teacher. Laura is passionate about marine conservation and she is a founder member of Snowdonia beach clean.

To follow our page please visit @theoutdoorswimmingsociety

To follow Laura’s wild swimming in Snowdonia please follow @wildwelshswimmer

Sara Barnes

Sara is an all-year skins swimmer in lakes, tarns and river pools, mostly in the Lake District, but does stray further afield to the Dorset coast, France, Scotland, Wales and Greece. She records the landscapes she swims in and the people she swims with through written and photographic stories. Marrying the two childhood dreams was the inspiration she needed to overcome a personal physical challenge. She is passionate about encouraging people to swim outdoors as a way of dealing with a mental, emotional or physical challenge. Sara loves to watch how the water changes people’s facial expression from a frown to a grin. ‘You leave grumpiness and stresses behind in the water’, she believes. ‘Take one swim at a time’.

Sara is a new member to the OSS team and is diligently working her way through content making sure typos, spelling mistakes and grammatical errors are no more. She will also be writing more articles for the Survive section under the expert guidance of Mark Harper.

Lexi Earl

Lexi joined the OSS team in autumn 2018, contributing one book review a month to the site. Publishers and writers wishing to have their books reviewed, please contact Lexi on books@outdoorswimmingsociety.com or send review copies to: 16A Fishpond Drive, Nottingham, NG7 1DG.

Lexi has swum always, spending her childhood in the sea, rivers, dams and swimming pools around South Africa. She is now learning to swim in cold water and aims to learn how to swim through winter. Her current favourite wild spot is along the River Wye in Derbyshire but a trip to Hathersage Lido is always loved too. She writes at www.lexislettuces.blog

Rosy Eaton

Outdoor swimming combines Rosy’s great passions in life – swimming, wildlife and cake. She’s never happier than when watching wildlife from the water, searching river beds for caddis cases or watching otters from the river bank.

Rosy has worked on environmental policy and nature conservation for nearly 20 years and swum outdoors for as long as she can remember. A lifetime of swimming and nature conservation have given her a strong concern for the health of our waters and the impact on both swimmers and wildlife.

Rosy is working with the OSS to provide technical expertise on water quality, river health and environmental policy.

Chris Booth

For the past 7 years Chris has been swimming regularly with the Wild Ones at Portobello Beach in Edinburgh. His true passion though is seeking out the wildest lochs, rivers and waterfalls, and jumping in whenever possible!
In 2019, Chris will be helping with wildswim.com. tidying up entries and duplications, helping with community collections such as the UK Festive Swim Calendar, to help make the map an even more wonderful resource for the wild swimming community.

Owen Hayman

Owen is a swimming access campaigner, living and swimming in the middle of what was once known as “Sheffield Lakeland”, an area dominated by large majestic functioning reservoir lakes.

Along with many others in the wider Yorkshire area and beyond, Owen is working to bring swimmers together, to collectively challenge social stigmas and the widespread prohibition of free outdoor swimming in inland waters.

@owainhaeman

Erin Jeffery

Erin is the Events and Society Assistant having a hand in all things concerning the Outdoor Swimming Society.

Her love of swimming began in the pool, following the blue line for up to 100km a week for many years. She competed at a national and international level, until graduating from Loughborough University. A few years later, a chance entry into a sea swimming event in Australia ignited a new, and very different, love for swimming. Since then she has hunted for beautiful places to swim outdoors wherever travels have taken her.

Erin is a keen skier and also jumps at the chance to explore waterways on her paddleboard. Having spent time in India learning to teach yoga, you’ll sometimes find her in tree pose on top of mountains! Competitive by nature, Erin is now trying her hand at triathlon. She has faced her fears of deep, dark waters and is ready for adventures with the OSS…

@erinrjeffery

Ali Couch

Ali joined the OSS in March 2019 as our new Wild Swim Group Coordinator.

Her role includes creating resources and an online network for community swimming groups. Ali is the first port of call for group leaders and new groups seeking advice from the OSS. She also maintains our website’s Wild Swim Group list. Ali set up Emsworth Sea Swimmers last year and has belonged to two other south coast groups so she has first hand experience of the difference groups make in the local community and the challenges they face too.

You can contact Ali on groups@outdoorswimmingsociety.com.

Ali’s career is in communications. She spent nine years working for the House of Lords and 15 years working in the charity and education sectors. She grew up in Portsmouth, where her passion for swimming and travelling began. She has backpacked through 61 countries (so far) and has swam off every continent. She is a keen scuba diver and a marine survey volunteer for ORCA.

Jon Stubbington

Jon first became aware of the OSS in 2016 when his wife Juliet signed them both up as volunteers for that year’s Dart 10k. That event kick-started a love of outdoor swimming that has led to him dunking himself in cold water everywhere from the south coast of England to the north western tip of Scotland. Jon and Juliet have been involved with the OSS ever since, assisting at events as well as swimming the Bantham Swoosh in 2017.
After making the move from volunteer to become part of the OSS Event Team, Jon is now the Event Manager for the 10th anniversary Dart 10k swim.

Karen Smith

Karen found outdoor swimming via triathlon in 2016. She discovered that she was most definitely not a triathlete – but fell in LOVE with swimming in Lakes and Lidos. Every spare moment she has is spent at her local lido, if not swimming chatting and eating cake. She swam the Dart 10k in 2018, is swimming Coniston in 2019 and has a Windermere one way in her sights for 2020. She finds tidal pools places of wonder and magic.
Karen is really excited to be the new Swim Champs Coordinator for The OSS, helping the Champs to beam the swim Love all over the world!
Please email champs@outdoorswimmingsociety.com to get in touch with Karen.

Justine Harvey

Growing up in the north east of England Justine learnt to swim in various Victorian baths with the occasional dip in the bracing North Sea. As an adult, she rekindled her passion for outdoor swimming in London’s lidos and ponds and has become evangelical about the benefits of cold water swimming.

Justine is responsible for the news stories on the OSS website and newsletter. Get in touch with your events, films, lido updates or stories of amazing swimming achievements at news@outdoorswimmingsociety.com

@justinefharvey

OSS SWIM CHAMPS 2019

leo gundle

Leo Gundle

@leography

Katie Maggs

@tonicofthesea

niall meehan

Niall Meegan

@niall_verso

alex sehgal

Alex Sehgal

@theoutdooralex

Dean Hall

@swimminginmiracles

Luke Richards

@swim4recovery

lance sagar

Lance Sagar

@rivervoyagers

Amira

@amirainwater

Bernadette Leask

@bumblebambi

Liz Ke

@lizkefotografie

tomasz madej

Tomasz Madej

@100swimmers100pools

Carina Bruwer

@carinabruwer

Vivien Solari

Vivien Solari

@coldseawarmheart

annie taylor

Annie Taylor

@annie.taylor.creates

Arthur Irving

@arthurirving

Lindsey Cole

@stompycole

ella foote

Ella Foote

@ellachloeswims

Leo Gundle

Leo co-founded the South West Seal Pups (also known as just ‘Pups’), a Bristol-based group of student and young adult outdoor swimmers.

He’s been an all-seasons swimmer for a number of years, and his love of winter swimming spread to friends at University, which lead to the creation of the Pups. The group has grown rapidly, and meets up to swim every weekend, as well as embarking on occasional ‘Microholidays’.

Growing up in London, Leo was a regular at the Bathing Ponds on Hampstead Heath. First swimming in ice in 2014, the experience of breaking his way through the ice whilst picking up large slabs was “addictive” and he has looked forward to the winter season every year since! The joy of wild swimming continued to University where, luckily, there is an abundance of terrific swim spots.

As a fourth year medical student, the academic demands are consistently high. However, when he’s not in lectures or on placement in the hospital, he enjoys running, photography and planning future swims.

Something that Leo particularly loves about swimming, particularly in the cold season, is the camaraderie and the madness; after stripping off and jumping in, he knows it’s going to be a great day.

Follow @southwest_sealpups and @leography

Katie Maggs

Katie is an all year round daily open water sea swimmer, writer, motivational speaker and photographer based in the small coastal town of Penzance in Cornwall.

Katie swims in the sea every day at dawn before heading off to her day job as a health sciences lecturer and Deputy Head of Department at a Further Education College in Cornwall.

Katie is an advocate of regular cold-water swimming being a natural cure for long term stress and an effective tool for anxiety management. She also believes it offers a robust link to longevity – possessing the capacity to reduce age related incidences of depression, disengagement, immobility and degenerative disease.

Within her writing for National newspapers and UK magazines Katie shares the inspirational stories of her fellow wild swimmers through her outdoor portrait photography whilst also documenting her own wild swimming walks around Cornwall’s’ stunning coastline.

“Swimming in the sea every day can be transformative. When you challenge yourself to swim in a body of water with unpredictable tides and weather conditions (with the added likelihood of seeing seals, dolphins and jellyfish) the positive effect on the strength of the body and the mind can be life changing.”  

In her award winning short film – ‘Tonic of the Sea’ – nominated for the BAFTA short film awards, Katie tells her story of how swimming all year round off the Cornish coast helped her to personally overcome stress related burnout and anxiety.

Katie has since finished her first self-help book also titled ‘Tonic of the Sea’ (currently sent to publishers) where she describes more details of her journey with mental health, crucial factors that supported her recovery and clear achievable suggestions to stay well in the future.

To follow Katie’s sea swimming around the Cornish coast or to hear more about her current projects and 2019 festival talks and appearances you can do so via her website www.tonicofthesea.co.uk or by following her on Twitter and Instagram @tonicofthesea.

 

Niall Meegan

Born in Dún Laoghaire, Co. Dublin, Niall’s early swimming education took place in the local sea water baths, progressing through the baby, kids and then the “big” pool. Nearby Sandycove Harbour was next before graduation as a fully fledged open water swimmer at the world renowned Forty Foot. As a young teenager it wasn’t unusual to do the half mile walk from home to the Forty Foot two or three times a day – in summer.

Niall now lives in Greystones, Co. Wicklow where – winter and summer – he swims daily at sunrise in The Cove. Joined by an assortment of fellow swimrisers, the swims are purely recreational and always in skins.

Instagram: @niall_verso

Alex Sehgal

Hi, I’m Alex! I’m a 25 year old PhD researcher based in Edinburgh. I’ve been in water for as long as I can remember – my mum tells me I could swim before I could crawl! I swam competitively through school but fell out of love with it when I moved to university. I only took to open water last summer and was instantly hooked. It’s SO addictive.

When I’m not doing science, I spend my time drinking too much coffee, swimming, diving, paddle boarding or lifting heavy things that don’t need to be moved… And when I AM doing science I’m constantly dreaming about my next adventure! Other interests of mine include: puppies, ice cream, craft beer, rugby and any all things adrenaline-fuelled.

I played pretty much every sport I could growing up but there’s nothing that quite compares to the feeling of being immersed in water outdoors. I can’t recommend it enough.

@theoutdooralex

Dean Hall

Dean is a two-time cancer survivor and record-setting swimmer. He is the first person to swim the entire length of the Willamette River in Oregon (2014) and the River Shannon in Ireland (2017). He accomplished these feats of endurance to prove to fellow cancer patients that you don’t have to give up your dreams or your drive simply because you have received a diagnosis.

Dean has been a therapist for nearly 30 years and logged over fifty-thousand face-to-face sessions with clients. He specialises in helping clients recover from trauma, anxiety and health conditions like chronic pain and cancer. He is an author, a highly sought-after speaker, Blue Mind ambassador, and pioneering adventure environmentalist.

Having experienced radical emotional and physical healing during his river swims, Dean’s mission is to save our planet’s scenic waters. He hopes to accomplish this by getting as many swimmers out of chlorine tanks and into wild waterways as he possibly can. He believes when you experience firsthand the calm of a lake, the flow of a river or the power and pull of an ocean you can’t help but fall in love with it, and like Jacques Cousteau used to say, “You protect what you love.”

To follow Dean’s adventures or contact him for a speaking engagement:

Instagram: @swimminginmiracles

Website: www.swimminginmiracles.com

Luke Richards

Luke is an ultra-marathon swimmer from Melbourne Australia.

In 2012 his life was on a singular trajectory, he was caught in the cycle of addiction with no hope of recovery. Following an attempt on his own life began the journey of recovery. In recovery Luke has been blessed with the most meaningful relationship he has ever had, two beautiful boys and a strong desire to live life to its fullest. In open water swimming he found a way to energise his body and soul.

He took up swimming as a sport for the first time in 2016 to support his wife’s dream of swimming in and open water event. In open water swimming he found a way to heal himself through illustrating how much he has changed. He decided that he wanted to share the history to help other find recovery and now uses ultra-marathon swimming to show that people with addiction are not lost causes and have the capacity to change and live amazing life.

You follow his journey here @swim4recovery

Lance Sagar

In 2015 Lance decided to see if it was possible to swim between the towns of Wetherby and Boston Spa. It turned out it was, though not without some challenges along the way. Since then he’s been fascinated by swimming from point to point by river, exploring new routes and mapping the journeys in order to share them with others.   

“In 2019 I’m looking to research, swim and write up as many new river journeys as possible. I’m interested in opening up new routes, ones that may not have been swam before, or at least ones that few people are aware of. I like the idea of swimmable river routes becoming normalised, just as famous mountain hikes are today. I’m also planning on shooting an autumnal wild swimming album in the Yorkshire Dales as the rivers and waterfalls there are incredible.”

@rivervoyagers

Amira

Always in a bathing suit on the hunt for single digit temperatures in warm water climates, Amira fell back in love with swimming after a decade away from the pool only to discover the wonders that lie in open water swimming and the infinite pleasures of cold water.

Describing the maritime coast of the Mediterranean as ‘mother-nature’s museum’ she has found outdoor adventures to be the best remedy for her as a self-diagnosed sufferer of social media anxiety.

Aside from gearing up to non-competitively compete in 5 and 10km swims throughout the season, Amira will be attempting to swim the English Channel in 2020.

@amirainwater

Bernadette Leask

I’m completely obsessed and addicted to Scotland and showing it off, from it’s Lochs to it’s islands and everything in between.

I grew up in the Shetland Islands, which explains why I have such a love of the sea and islands. I spent my youth never more than 3 miles from the sea, playing on a beach (pebble, of course) or running around the many deserted crofts or up a hill.

But despite growing up on an island, I have (well had) a strange fear of the water, and even worse… I couldn’t swim!

Thankfully those fears are mostly behind me and now I can’t wait to encourage others to do the same.

I run an Instagram page and blog which shows my travels and adventures around Scotland, and what started off as hill walking has progressed to winter mountaineering, wild camping, outdoor swimming, cycling, hiking and paddle boarding. In short, doing as much as I can to be outdoors and enjoying this beautiful country.

I currently live in central Scotland near Glasgow. Not as near to the sea as I would like, but it is home for now.

I don’t claim to be, nor am I an expert swimmer, but I hope that I will inspire and encourage some of you to get out there and try something new, whether in Scotland or further afield. Even if it’s just dunking your face underwater!

@bumblebambi

Liz Ke

Liz Ke calls herself a “photographer, triathlete and mountain lover”: as a triathlete, she can see much of the world through the power of her lens and legs, one of which she uses to hike through forests and balance on mountaintops, the other to fully appreciate the moment wherever she happens to be.

She developed her passion for outdoor and cold water swimming through her triathlon training and her mother’s love for all bodies and temperatures of water. Now her mantra is: the wilder the better. 

“When I’m out there I feel so small – and it makes me realise that if I’m so small then maybe my problems are even smaller” – that’s what Liz prefers to tell people who ask her for the “Why”.

@lizkefotografie

Tomasz Madej

Polish swimming anthropologist, as he says about himself. Tomasz was born into a family of swimming coaches, so he started swimming earlier than walking. Now he divides his life between work in The Asia and Pacific Museum and being a swimming coach for disabled swimmers. Privately he trains three times per week. Searching of the essence of swimming brought him to open water. Now he devotes his time swimming with his underwater camera among others swimmers and capturing people and their passion for swimming, and historical pools. He is also interested in the history of swimming, practising his trudgen stroke and…  trying to find his zen in swimming.

Instagram: @100swimmers100pools

Facebook/100swimmers100pools

 

Carina Bruwer

Carina Bruwer is a proudly South African marathon swimmer, professional musician and mother of three.  

Her self-proclaimed addition to swimming and sunshine, combined with a healthy yearning for nature and solitude, has taken her to exciting corners of the world, with some of her most notable swims including the English Channel, Gibraltar Straits, False Bay, Bonifacio Straits, Messina Straits (Quadruple), Triple Country (France-Monaco-Italy) and many more.  

For Carina, one of WOWSA’s Top Fifty Female Adventurous swimmers who has broken more than a couple of long distance records in her time, finding and feeding her soul in the open water, and in fact at her favourite seaside pool, the Sea Point Pavilion is what it’s all about.  “The world isn’t always the easiest place to navigate, but I feel I can take on anything as long as I’ve my daily dose of swimming-induced endorphin-meditation!”. She also tries to make her big swims count by raising funds and awareness through her Swim For Hope platform, for Muzukidz, an organisation that offers the opportunity for children from South African townships to learn the violin.

@carinabruwer

Vivien Solari

Nature lover and sea obsessive, open sky swimming nurtures that part of me that needs to feel connected to the wilderness. Inspired by the ever changing beauty from the watery perspective and the rejuvenating feeling of cold water, I started taking pictures to share with others through my Instagram page, hopefully to inspire others to get outside and connect with nature through swimming. I believe it has so much to offer and if we can find that connection with nature that means something to us we will want to protect it.

I swim all year round in all weathers from fully naked to fully wet suited, mostly from my local spot in the south of England , but I’m always on the lookout for new places to explore. A quick skinny dip can make me just as happy as several hours challenging swimming. I love to plan swims to explore the landscape from the water. Last years favourite was a swim from the Hurst Castle Lighthouse(on the mainland) to the Needles lighthouse on the Isle of Wight.

Through my work as a fashion model I have published my photography and poetry, and love to share my passion with other artists through film and photography. I always travel with my swimsuit as I’m always looking for the opportunity of getting to know a new place, people and the wildlife from the water.

I’m looking forward to another year of connecting with people and sharing the wonderful experience of swimming outdoors and adding new swims to the Wild swim map.

@coldseawarmheart

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E_6Poyu_h04

Annie Taylor

@annie.taylor.creates

Arthur Irving

Arthur is a year round swimmer, whose swimming adventures started as a recovery swim / Wim Hof homage / general goof in the Hampstead ponds.

He is a keen runner, having completed London, New York, Paris and Amsterdam marathons amongst others and several Half Marathons and 10km races.

Within the past 3 years he has built his front crawl from scratch and having completed the Serpentine 2-mile swim in 2018, will swam the Dart 10K this autumn.

@arthurirving @stonecoldswimmers

Lindsey Cole

Lindsey fell head over tail in love with wild swimming when she swam the length of the River Thames for an anti-plastic campaign during winter. Random people appeared behind rural reeds and asked if they could join her. That was her first introduction to the community and it really warmed up her soul. People messaged inviting her  to join their swim spot all over the uk and she met those she’d been speaking to online at the UK cold Water Swimming Champs in Tooting Bec Lido. So, she devised a cycle tour where she could accept the swim invites and cycle to the inaugural Scottish Cold Water Swim Champs, sharing the stories of those she swam with.

Lindsey feels a bit like She-Ra once she’s been for a cold water dip- invincible!. So, she’s currently still dipping around Britain accepting any swim invites she receives. From swimming with seals in Shetland to dancing to a drum and a native Indian flute in the river Derwent, every dip has been and always is magically unique. What Lindsey likes best about it all is it makes her feel alive.

@stompycole

Ella Foote

Ella is a year-round swimmer, who has a varied swim appetite. She is most happy when swimming in wild secret spots with friends, but is proud to have some significant distance achievements on her swim CV. Living adjacent to the Thames in Berkshire means she dips mostly in the green belt rivers and lakes, but likes nothing more than a swim in the sea.
Follow Ella on Instagram @ellachloeswims.

Loved and Lost

Lynne Roper

1961-2016

Jonathan Joyce

1971-2013

Lynne Roper

Even if you didn’t know Lynne, chances are that your swimming world has been influenced by her, that a ripple she set off has touched your shores. Lynne was a vibrant member of the swimming community and key contributor to the Outdoor Swimming Society over many years. She had a unique take on the world and a voice within swimming, which was much loved and is sorely missed. She died from a brain tumour on Saturday 13th August 2016, age 55.

A book of her blog ‘Wild Woman Swimming’ was published in September 2018, and is available in the OSS shop.

Lynne Roper’s love of water was cemented during her Devon childhood, and it never left her. She went from art college to the RAF, seeing duty in the first Gulf War and completed tours in Germany, the Falklands, Canada, the US and Cyprus.

In 1998 she completed a degree in film and media studies at Stirling University, undertook at PGCE at Wolverhampton University the following year, and taught in Stirling for a few years before returning to Devon and settling on Dartmoor.

Later she became a paramedic.

Lynne turned to wild swimming to regain her physical and emotional health after a double mastectomy. She immersed herself in rivers, the sea and the friendships formed through water. For her, wild swimming was never about how far or fast you swam, or how cold the water. It was always about the experience itself, and the connection with the environment. She fitted wild swimming around her shift patterns, saying that water washed away the stresses of the job.

She gave many people the confidence to start wild swimming; her infectious smile, her ability to listen and her calm patience never faltered. She readily shared her ability to read water, her knowledge and her judgement.

Lynne worked alongside Kate for a few years with the two of them providing all the content for the OSS website and newsletters, doing book reviews and stories and handling media queries. She went on to develop the ideas and content behind most of what is now the ‘Survive’ section of the OSS website. She also acted as the best press officer we have ever had, developing safety advice and liaising with the media to ensure the joy of wild swimming was not lost to stories of danger. She was not afraid to go on the Jeremy Vine Show (for example) or speak to the media after a tragic death – she knew it was important to communicate how to swim safely at these times, and her paramedic background made her confident to do this without upsetting the bereaved. All of this was a gift from her to the community for something she believed in.

Lynne was hugely enjoyed, admired and learnt from. She was a free-spirited, no-nonsense thinker who fought for what she thought was right. She was funny and ballsy and not afraid to scrap on Facebook. Her kind, infectious and full-colour personality made her a brilliant friend to many. She was direct, intelligent, opinion-rich and spirited. She hated bloody tow floats.

Lynne regularly arranged wild swims for local swimmers and visiting OSS members from further afield, she ran the warming tent at the Dart 10k and the Swoosh looking after chilly swimmers and she founded two local swimming groups (Devon & Cornwall Wild Swimmers, and later, Into The Fish Dimension).

Lynne wrote a blog, Wild Woman Swimming blog ( https://wildwomanswimming.wordpress.com/). She was diagnosed with a brain tumour in February 2016, which she named ‘Hunt’ and wrote passionately and painfully honest accounts about it in her blog Out Of My Brains. (https://outofmybrains.org/). Always an advocate of the NHS, when she learned she was terminally ill, she stepped up her efforts to highlight the impact of funding restraint on acute frontline health services and social care through this blog, and she was fearless in relating that directly to her own situation. Her writing was sensitive, frank, funny and clever. As was she.

She died peacefully with her mother Jenny at her side in the early hours of Saturday, 13th August 2016 after her battle with cancer fought with gumption and spirit only Lynne could have summoned. She was buried at Sharpham Natural Burial Grounds, surrounded by friends, family and her OSS friends. Her funeral wreath was taken to the Dart10k the next day and strapped around one of the swimmers’ photo frames, crowning the glory of finishers. Her influence was huge – when she passed away, many paid tributes to her who hadn’t ever had the chance to meet her.

Lynne’s biggest legacy, which will live on in the communities she has created and influenced, is the way she connected people together. Either through her love of the water, politics, her writing, her work and sense of adventure – she brought like-minded spirits together, “one of life’s troubadours” says friend and swimmer Gilly Robinson.

We feel lucky to have known her.

Jonathan Joyce

Everyone has their good days. Days when they are at their best; full of energy and confidence, open to the world around them, its people and possibilities. Days when kindness and enthusiasm aren’t hard and creativity comes naturally.

For most people these days come once in a while. Tiredness, stress, hassle and worry all chip away at that version of self. After all, it’s fucking hard work to be open, energetic and kind all the time, to take risks and encourage others, to laugh even when knackered, cold and wet.

After his death JJ’s long-term friend and business partner Bob Thomson from Storm ID wrote these words, and said ‘Of all the people I have been lucky enough to meet, Jonathan had the most good days. He had an incredible capacity to be at his best, regardless of any external or internal circumstance. Whip smart and charming, through sheer force of will JJ consistently won the battle to energise those around him rather than need energy from them, to look for the hard positive over the easy negative, to be the one saying “Why not?” rather than “Why?”. Without fail JJ would apply logic and intelligence to matters at hand while injecting his surroundings with humour, playfulness and warmth.”

This was the JJ that the team in the OSS – and the Devon wild swimming scene – came to know and love when he moved to Ashburton Devon in 2011.

JJ was an adventurous wild swimmer and challenge swimmer whose love for people and water was unsurpassed.  He gave many gifts to all who were lucky enough to have met him and known him. One of them was to build wildswim.com with Kate Rew and his company Storm ID for our community of swimmers.

‘I had advertised for a volunteer map editor,’ says Kate, ‘for an online crowd sourced swim map that I had been touting around London for years to try and get funding to build. A man called JJ rang me and said “I won’t be your map editor, your map is crap, but I will build you a new one…”. I sent him my dream brief and it was that simple: a few months later, wildswim.com was born.’ This act typifies many of the attributes his friends and the wider community loved about JJ: generous, clever, open, bold, funny. It exemplifies his nature of exploration, discovery and sharing. And his competitiveness: other similar products came on to the market around and after wildswim.com was launched, but JJ absolutely relished the challenge: wildswim.com was going to be the best in the world.

JJ died suddenly, on 15th June 2013, age 41, while out swimming with a friend in Beesands, Devon. His swimming family were thrown into shock by the sudden death of a man they all loved. He and his swimming partner weren’t doing anything out of the ordinary, just training, ploughing up and down parallel to the shore, only 25 metres from the beach, when something happened and Jonathan lost consciousness, and later died.  We still don’t know why.

We swim on with him in our hearts.

Further tributes: